BILL NUMBER: AB 787	AMENDED
	BILL TEXT

	AMENDED IN ASSEMBLY  APRIL 15, 2009

INTRODUCED BY   Assembly Member Hill

                        FEBRUARY 26, 2009

   An act to  amend   add  Section 
1960.5 of   3011.5 to  the  Welfare and
Institutions   Elections  Code, relating to
 juveniles   elections  .



	LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


   AB 787, as amended, Hill. State Commission on Juvenile Justice:
report. 
   (1) Existing law authorizes an eligible voter to vote by a vote by
mail ballot and to become a permanent vote by mail voter upon
satisfying specified application requirements.  
   The bill would require, if the elections official determines that
more than one first-class stamp or the equivalent postage is required
to return a vote by mail ballot, that the elections official provide
a notification to the voter of how many first-class stamps or the
equivalent postage is required.  
   By increasing the duties of local elections officials, the bill
would impose a state-mandated local program.  
   (2) The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse
local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the
state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that
reimbursement.  
   This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates
determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state,
reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to these
statutory provisions.  
   Existing law requires the State Commission on Juvenile Justice to
develop a Juvenile Justice Operational Master Plan. The commission
was required, on or before May 1, 2008, to provide an interim report
to the Legislature, including the status of the work of the
commission and the strategies it has identified to date. 

   This bill would specify additional information to be included in
the report of the commission relating to the number of youth
transferred to each county, each county's recidivism rate,
nonresidential dispositions, supervision programs, reentry and
aftercare programs, county costs for caring for the transferred
population, and specified pilot projects. 
   Vote: majority. Appropriation: no. Fiscal committee: yes.
State-mandated local program:  no  yes  .



THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

   SECTION 1.    Section 3011.5 is added to the 
 Elections Code   , to read:  
   3011.5.  If the elections official determines that more than one
first-class stamp or the equivalent postage is required to return a
vote by mail ballot, the elections official shall provide a
notification to the voter of how many first-class stamps or the
equivalent postage is required. 
   SEC. 2.    If the Commission on State Mandates
determines that this act contains costs mandated by the state,
reimbursement to local agencies and school districts for those costs
shall be made pursuant to Part 7 (commencing with Section 17500) of
Division 4 of Title 2 of the Government Code.  
  SECTION 1.    Section 1960.5 of the Welfare and
Institutions Code is amended to read:
   1960.5.  (a) The State Commission on Juvenile Justice, pursuant to
Section 1798.5, shall develop a Juvenile Justice Operational Master
Plan. On or before January 1, 2009, the commission shall develop and
make available for implementation by the counties the following
strategies:
   (1) Risk and needs assessment tools to evaluate the programming
and security needs of all youthful offenders and at-risk youth.
   (2) Juvenile justice universal data collection elements, which
shall be common to all counties.
   (3) Criteria and strategies to promote a continuum of
evidence-based responses to youthful offenders.
   (b) In drafting the Juvenile Justice Operational Master Plan, the
commission shall take into consideration both of the following:
   (1) Evidence-based programs and risk and needs assessment tools
currently in use by the counties.
   (2) The costs of implementing these strategies.
   (c) On or before May 1, 2008, the commission shall provide an
interim report to the Legislature, which shall include all of the
following:
   (1) The status of the work of the commission and the strategies it
has identified to date.
   (2) The number of youth transferred to each county.
   (3) The recidivism rate for each county for the transferred
population.
   (4) The number of nonresidential dispositions, such as day
treatment, community service, restitution, and mental health, drug
and alcohol, and other counseling programs by county.
   (5) The number and type of supervision programs, including house
arrest, electronic monitoring, and intensive probation supervision.
   (6) The reentry and aftercare programs prepared and observed for
each offender.
   (7) The total amount of county costs for caring for the
transferred population.
   (8) The costs and outcomes resulting from the two specialized
population pilot projects.