BILL NUMBER: SB 1006	INTRODUCED
	BILL TEXT


INTRODUCED BY   Senator Pavley

                        FEBRUARY 10, 2010

   An act to add Section 9005 to the Public Resources Code, relating
to natural resources.


	LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


   SB 1006, as introduced, Pavley. Natural resources: climate
change.:
   Existing law declares that resource conservation is of fundamental
importance to the prosperity and welfare of the people of the state.
Existing law states that it is the policy of the state to adopt
conservation practices to save the basic resources of soil, water,
and air from unreasonable and economically preventable waste and
destruction.
   There is in state government the Natural Resources Agency. The
agency consists of various departments including the Department of
Conservation, the Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, the
Department of Fish and Game, and the Wildlife Conservation Board.
   This bill would require the Natural Resources Agency, in
developing and implementing climate change adaptation strategies and
activities, to fully consider and undertake, to the maximum extent
practicable, initiatives that, among other things, protect or enhance
natural ecosystem functions in relation to wetlands, beaches, flood
plains, watersheds, and greenhouse gas emissions.
   Vote: majority. Appropriation: no. Fiscal committee: yes.
State-mandated local program: no.


THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

  SECTION 1.  Section 9005 is added to the Public Resources Code, to
read:
   9005.  In developing and implementing climate change adaptation
strategies and activities, the Natural Resources Agency shall fully
consider and undertake, to the maximum extent practicable,
initiatives that do all of the following:
   (a) Protect or enhance natural ecosystem functions, including
protection, maintenance, or restoration of natural infrastructure as
wetlands, reefs, beaches, and estuaries to buffer communities from
floodwaters or storms, watershed protection to maintain water quality
and groundwater recharge, or flood plain restoration to improve
natural flood control capacity.
   (b) Use nonstructural approaches to protect communities, including
practices that utilize, enhance, or mimic the natural hydrologic
cycle process of infiltration, evapotranspiration, and reuse.
   (c) Are consistent with state and federal conservation and
environmental laws and, to the maximum extent practicable, avoid
environmental degradation and emission of greenhouse gases.
   (d) Draw upon lessons learned and best practices from existing
climate change adaptation planning efforts.