BILL ANALYSIS                                                                                                                                                                                                    



                                                                  AB 1451
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          CONCURRENCE IN SENATE AMENDMENTS
          AB 1451 (Hayashi)
          As Amended  June 15, 2012
          Majority vote
           
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          |ASSEMBLY:  |70-0 |(April 12,      |SENATE: |36-0 |(June 28,      |
          |           |     |2012)           |        |     |2012)          |
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           Original Committee Reference:    ED.  

           SUMMARY  :  Adds new requirements to the California High School 
          Coaching Education and Training Program (HSCTP) for training on 
          understanding the signs and symptoms of concussions and the 
          appropriate response to concussions. 

           The Senate amendments  specify that concussion training may be 
          fulfilled through entities offering free, online, or other types 
          of training courses.

           AS PASSED BY THE ASSEMBLY  , this bill was substantially similar 
          to the version passed by the Senate.

           FISCAL EFFECT  :  Unknown.  This bill is keyed non-fiscal by the 
          Legislative Counsel.  

           COMMENTS  :  This bill requires additional training for high 
          school sports coaches on understanding the signs and symptoms of 
          concussions and the appropriate response to concussions.  

          Coaches Training:  Currently the California Interscholastic 
          Federation (CIF) offers training programs to high school coaches 
          who receive a certificate upon course completion (typically an 
          eight hour class).  To date more than 60,000 coaches have taken 
          the training, which costs approximately $60 per person.  Some 
          school districts pay for the program while others require the 
          coach to pay for it.  The completed certificate is transferable 
          between school districts.  CIF's coaches training program under 
          the HSCTP does not currently include instruction on concussions. 
           CIF currently offers a free online concussion training course 
          for coaches where they receive an immediate printed 
          certification upon completion.  Of the 67,929 coaches in 
          California, 5,323 have taken the online course.  The bill 
          specifies that concussion training may be fulfilled through 








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          entities offering free, online, or other types of training 
          courses.

          Currently, coaches must complete a CPR/First Aid course and 
          renew that training every two years.  Because this bill includes 
          training on concussions as part of the CPR/First Aid training 
          requirement, coaches will be required to receive updated 
          concussion training every two years as well.  This renewal 
          requirement is important because the strategies for dealing with 
          head injuries are often changing. 

          According to a nationwide study published in the Journal of 
          Athletic Training, football has the highest rate of concussions 
          in high school sports with 47 concussions occurring per 100,000 
          player games or practices.  Girls soccer has the second highest 
          rate of concussions in high school sports with 36 concussions 
          occurring per 100,000 player games or practices.  Boys soccer 
          and girls basketball have the third and fourth highest rate of 
          concussions in high school sports with 22 and 21 concussions per 
          100,000 player games or practices, respectively.  In the sport 
          of football alone, since 1997, at least 50 high school or 
          younger athletes have been killed or sustained serious head 
          injuries on the field.

          The National Federation of State High School Associations 
          reports that participation in high school sports continues to 
          increase, with more than seven million high school students 
          participating in 2005-2006.  Concussions are a serious and 
          growing public health issue for athletes involved in contact 
          sports - an estimated 300,000 sport-related traumatic brain 
          injuries, predominantly concussions, occur annually in the 
          United States.  Even more troubling, studies show as many as 20% 
          of all high school football players sustain concussions 
          annually. 

          Scientific studies have raised concerns about the long-term 
          impacts of head injuries in sports.  Although most headlines 
          focus on the deterioration of major football stars, youth are 
          also gravely at risk because of their developing brains.  
          According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), upwards of 
          three million sports- and recreation- related concussions occur 
          in the United States each year.  Football is the leading cause 
          for high school males, and soccer for females.     

          Concussions can occur in any sport and all concussions are 








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          serious.  Concussions are often difficult to identify because 
          they can occur without loss of consciousness.  A repeat 
          concussion that occurs before the brain recovers from the 
          first-usually within a short period of time can result in brain 
          swelling, permanent brain damage, and even death.  According to 
          the CDC, this condition is called second impact syndrome (SIS).  
          The American College of Sports Medicine estimated last year that 
          85% of all concussions among high school athletes go 
          undiagnosed, meaning many high school athletes are exposing 
          themselves to the risk of SIS.

            Previous legislation:  AB 1646 (Hayashi) of 2010, which was held 
          on the Assembly Appropriations Committee suspense file, would 
          have required training for coaches to be able to identify 
          symptoms of head and neck injury.  The additional training would 
          have been incorporated into coaches' first aid certification 
          renewal.

           
          Analysis Prepared by  :    Chelsea Kelley / ED. / (916) 319-2087 


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