BILL ANALYSIS                                                                                                                                                                                                    



                                                                  AB 1809
                                                                  Page  1

          Date of Hearing:   May 14, 2014

                        ASSEMBLY COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS
                                  Mike Gatto, Chair

                 AB 1809 (Maienschein) - As Amended:  April 23, 2014 

          Policy Committee:                              Business and  
          Professions  Vote:                            14-0

          Urgency:     No                   State Mandated Local Program:  
          Yes    Reimbursable:              No

           SUMMARY  

          This bill requires a person seeking to bring a dog into  
          California for resale or change of ownership to obtain a  
          standardized health certificate from a licensed veterinarian,  
          dated within 10 days prior to the dog's arrival, and submit the  
          certificate to the  county health department.    

          It also allows local agencies to charge a reasonable fee to  
          cover the costs associated with receiving and processing the  
          documentation.  

           FISCAL EFFECT  

          Negligible state fiscal effect. The bill does not require local  
          agencies to do anything with the received documents.  

          To the extent local agencies occur additional costs to analyze  
          or further investigate the documents, costs would not be  
          reimbursable.  If costs were incurred, the bill allows local  
          agencies to charge a fee to cover their costs of receiving and  
          processing documentation.  

           COMMENTS  

           1)Purpose  . This bill intends to protect consumers from  
            purchasing or adopting sick animals and help prevent dogs  
            being imported into the state who may unknowingly be carrying  
            contagious diseases.  This bill is sponsored by the American  
            Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASCPA).  
            According to the author, California is currently one of only  
            two states that do not require dogs to be inspected and issued  








                                                                  AB 1809
                                                                  Page  2

            a Certificate of Veterinarian Inspection (CVI) or equivalent,  
            prior to, or upon, entry into the state.  Existing law  
            requires that imported dogs be healthy and have a current  
            rabies vaccination, but does not require documentation of a  
            dog's health status.  

            Supporters of this bill point out California consumers are  
            receiving tens of thousands of dogs shipped into the U.S. from  
            foreign countries, that these dogs are often sickly, and that  
            local animal control agencies have no practical ability to  
            track such importations.   

           2)Opposition  .  The Animal Council, an organization founded to  
            combat San Mateo County's spay-and-neuter laws, opposes this  
            bill, noting that in a state as large as California, dogs  
            moving intrastate are very similar to dogs coming from outside  
            as to public health risks, yet their movements would not be  
            tracked or recorded.
           3)Staff Comments  . As stated, this bill authorizes local agencies  
            to charge a fee to cover costs incurred for receiving and  
            processing documents. However, staff notes from a practical  
            perspective, charging a fee may deter compliance with the  
            reporting requirement.   

           Analysis Prepared by  :    Lisa Murawski / APPR. / (916) 319-2081