Amended in Assembly March 26, 2015

California Legislature—2015–16 Regular Session

Assembly BillNo. 1357


Introduced by Assembly Member Bloom

February 27, 2015


begin deleteAn act relating to chronic disease. end deletebegin insertAn act to add Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 104895.5) to Part 3 of Division 103 of the Health and Safety Code, relating to public health.end insert

LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST

AB 1357, as amended, Bloom. begin deleteChronic disease. end deletebegin insertChildren and Family Health Promotion Program.end insert

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Existing law provides various programs that prevent disease and promote health.

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This bill would establish the Children and Family Health Promotion Program in the Department of Public Health. This bill would require the program to consist of a competitive grant process in which grants are awarded by the department to counties, cities, nonprofit organizations, community-based organizations, and licensed clinics that seek to invest in childhood obesity and diabetes prevention activities and oral health programs. The bill would authorize the department to award a grant to any entity that will use the grant to support programs that use educational, environmental, policy, and other public health approaches to achieve specified goals.

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This bill would require the department to develop an application and application process for the program, and would provide that the program will be funded by moneys appropriated by the Legislature to the department for this purpose.

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This bill would make legislative findings and declarations relating to the consumption of sweetened beverages, childhood obesity, and dental disease.

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Existing law provides various programs for the monitoring, treatment, and prevention of chronic disease in California, including heart disease, cancer, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

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This bill would state the intent of the Legislature to enact legislation that would address the public health crisis relating to the growing prevalence of preventable chronic disease.

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Vote: majority. Appropriation: no. Fiscal committee: begin deleteno end deletebegin insertyesend insert. State-mandated local program: no.

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:

P2    1begin insert

begin insertSECTION 1.end insert  

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The Legislature finds and declares all of the
2following:

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3(a) Over 2.3 million California adults report having been
4diagnosed with diabetes, representing one out of every 12 adult
5Californians. The vast majority of diabetes cases in California are
6type 2, representing 1.9 million adults.

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7(b) According to the California Department of Public Health,
8diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in California, and
9determined to be the underlying cause of death in almost 8,000
10people each year. Diabetes may be underreported as a cause of
11death, and is a contributing factor to many deaths from heart
12disease and stroke.

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13(c) Adults with type 2 diabetes more often have other health
14problems. One out of every two adults with type 2 diabetes also
15has hypertension. This is two times higher than among those
16without diabetes. Adults with diabetes are also two times more
17likely to have cardiovascular disease than adults without diabetes.

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18(d) Hispanics, African Americans, Native Americans, and
19Asian/Pacific Islanders have higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes
20than non-Hispanic Whites. Hispanics and African Americans have
21two times higher prevalence: 7 percent of non-Hispanic Whites
22have type 2 diabetes, compared with 12 percent of Latinos, 9
23percent of Asian Americans, 14 percent of Pacific Islander
24Americans, 13 percent of African Americans, and 17.5 percent of
25Native American populations.

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P3    1(e) Type 2 diabetes, previously only seen among adults, is now
2increasing among children. If the current obesity trends are not
3reversed, it is predicted that one in three children and nearly
4one-half of Latino and African American children born in the year
52000 will develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. Research shows
6that overweight children have a much greater chance of being
7obese as adults, with all the health risks that entails. Heart disease
8is the leading cause of death in the United States, with diabetes
9as the seventh leading cause of death.

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10(f) There is overwhelming evidence of the link between obesity,
11diabetes, and heart disease and the consumption of sweetened
12beverages, such as soft drinks, energy drinks, sweet teas, and sports
13drinks. California adults who drink a soda or more per day are
1427 percent more likely to be overweight or obese, regardless of
15income or ethnicity.

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16(g) The rate of children who are overweight has also increased
17dramatically in recent decades. After being relatively constant
18from the 1960s to the 1970s, the prevalence of overweight children
19has more than quadrupled among children between 6 and 11 years
20of age and nearly tripled among those between 12 and 19 years
21of age. In California in 2010, 38 percent of children in grades 5,
227, and 9 were overweight or obese. Thirty-one of California’s 58
23counties experienced an increase in childhood overweight from
242005 to 2010.

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25(h) The obesity epidemic is of particular concern because obesity
26increases the risk of diabetes, heart disease, certain types of
27cancer, arthritis, asthma, and breathing problems. Depending on
28their level of obesity, from 60 percent to over 80 percent of obese
29adults have type 2 diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood
30pressure, or other related conditions. It has been reported that up
31to 60 percent of obese children 5 to 10 years of age have early
32signs of heart disease.

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33(i) According to nutritional experts, sweetened beverages, such
34as soft drinks, energy drinks, sweet teas, and sport drinks, offer
35little or no nutritional value, but massive quantities of added
36sugars. A 20-ounce bottle of soda contains the equivalent of
37approximately 16 teaspoons of sugar. Yet, the American Heart
38Association recommends that Americans consume no more than
39five to nine teaspoons of sugar per day.

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P4    1(j) Research shows that almost one-half of the extra calories
2Americans consume in their diet comes from sugar sweetened
3beverages, with the average American drinking nearly 50 gallons
4of sugar-sweetened beverages a year, the equivalent of 39 pounds
5of extra sugar every year.

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6(k) Research shows that 41 percent of California children 2 to
711 years of age and 62 percent of California teens 12 to 17 years
8of age drink soda daily, and for every additional serving of
9sweetened beverage that a child consumes a day, the likelihood
10of the child becoming obese increases by 60 percent.

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11(l) The proportion of youth drinking at least one sugary beverage
12per day was highest among Latinos at 48 percent, significantly
13higher than among whites at 33 percent. African- American youth,
14at 43 percent, and multi-racial youth, at 46 percent, also had
15significantly higher consumption than whites.

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16(m) Dental caries (tooth decay) are the most common chronic
17childhood disease, experienced by more than two-thirds of
18California’s children. Children who frequently or excessively
19consume beverages high in sugar are at increased risk for dental
20caries. Untreated dental caries can lead to pain, infection, tooth
21loss, and in severe cases, even death. It can slow normal growth
22and development by restricting nutritional intake. Children who
23are missing teeth may have chewing problems that limit their food
24choices and result in nutritionally inadequate diets.

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25(n) It is the intent of the Legislature to create a program
26designed to prevent and treat obesity, diabetes, heart and dental
27disease and reduce the burden of attendant health conditions that
28result from the overconsumption of sweetened beverages.

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29begin insert

begin insertSEC. 2.end insert  

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begin insertChapter 5 (commencing with Section 104895.5) is
30added to Part 3 of Division 103 of the end insert
begin insertHealth and Safety Codeend insertbegin insert, to
31read:end insert

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32 

33Chapter  begin insert5.end insert Children and Family Health Promotion
34Program
35

 

36

begin insert104895.5.end insert  

(a) The Children and Family Health Promotion
37Program is hereby established in the Department of Public Health.

38(b) The program shall consist of a competitive grant process in
39which grants are awarded by the department to counties, cities,
40nonprofit organizations, community-based organizations, and
P5    1clinics licensed pursuant to Chapter 1 (commencing with Section
21200) of Division 2 that seek to invest in childhood obesity and
3diabetes prevention activities and oral health programs.

4(c) The department may award a grant to any entity described
5in subdivision (b) that will use the grant to support programs that
6use educational, environmental, policy, and other public health
7 approaches to achieve all the following goals:

8(1) Improve access to, and consumption of, healthy, safe, and
9affordable foods and beverages.

10(2) Reduce access to, and consumption of, calorie-dense and
11nutrient-poor foods.

12(3) Encourage physical activity and decrease sedentary
13behavior.

14(4) Raise awareness about the importance of nutrition and
15physical activity to childhood obesity and diabetes prevention.

16(d) The department shall develop an application and application
17process for the program.

18(e) Applicants interested receiving a grant shall submit an
19application to the department.

20(f) The program shall be funded by any moneys appropriated
21by the Legislature to the department for this purpose.

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22

SECTION 1.  

It is the intent of the Legislature to enact
23legislation that would address the public health crisis relating to
24the growing prevalence of preventable chronic disease.

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